skip to main content

Course Descriptions

11 months ago

GRAPHING CALCULATORS ARE USED IN ALL LEVELS OF MATH AT BANGOR AREA HIGH SCHOOL.

THE MATH DEPARTMENT SUGGESTS A TEXAS INSTRUMENT TI-83 PLUS or TI-84 PLUS.


Pre-Algebra

This course will cover the topics of integers, equations, rational numbers, proportions, percents, inequalities, functions, graphing and polynomials. (Prerequisite: This course is designed for students not proficient in skills needed for Algebra I)


Algebra I (8, 9)

Algebra I will include properties of numbers, one-variable equations and inequalities, graphing relations and functions, analyzing linear equations, systems of equations and inequalities, operations with polynomials, factoring, probability, measures of variation, statistics, standardized test practice, and problem solving strategies. (Prerequisite: Grade of 84% or better in Pre-Algebra)

 

Algebra II (9, 10)

Algebra II will include solving equations and inequalities, linear relations and functions, systems of equations and inequalities, matrices, polynomial operations and factoring, rational expressions and equations, radical expressions and equations, imaginary and complex numbers, quadratic functions and inequalities, exponential and logarithmic functions, sequences and series, standardized test practice. (Prerequisite: Passing grade for Algebra I)

 

Honors Algebra II (9)

Honors Algebra II progresses at a very fast pace, covering the greatest breath and depth of topics as is possible. Students are expected to have mastered the skills and thoroughly understand the concepts covered in prior courses. The course will focus on the extension of the number system to a complex field, elementary functions using multiple representations (graphical, numerical, algebraic, and verbal) including linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions, linear systems and matrices, and the study of probability and of sequences and series. Critical thinking skills are developed through the use of a variety of application problems. (Prerequisite: Grade of 87% or better in Honors Algebra I (8th grade) with teacher recommendation)

 

Geometry (10, 11)

Geometry will include the following topics: basic properties of algebra and technology relating to points, lines, and planes, methods of reasoning, angle relationships, parallel and perpendicular lines and planes, triangles, proportional line segments, polygons, similar figures, congruence, circles, arcs, and angles, constructions, loci, coordinate geometry, area, volumes. (Prerequisite: Passing grade for Algebra II)

 

Honors Geometry (10)

The Honors Geometry course is intended for the student who has the mathematical ability to assimilate and apply new material at a faster pace then the average college preparatory student. Students will apply deductive and inductive reasoning to the development of proofs and the solving of problems. Basic geometric concepts such as points and lines, parallelism, similarity, congruency, polygons, right triangles, basic trigonometric concepts, coordinate geometry, an introduction to solid geometry, and circles will be studied in depth and applied to problem-solving situations. Geometers sketchpad will be used in this course. (Prerequisite: 87% or better in Honors Algebra II with teacher recommendation)

 

Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus (11, 12)

Trigonometry will include circular functions, graphs of circular functions, solutions of triangles, identities and applications of trigonometry. Pre-Calculus will include coordinates and graphs, functions, logarithms, systems, limits, and sequences. (Prerequisite: Passing grade for Algebra II)


Honors Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus (11)

Honors Trigonometry is an advanced course where students are expected to have mastered the skills and the concepts covered in prior courses. Honors Trigonometry will include circular functions, graphs of circular functions, solutions of triangles, identities and complex numbers. Pre-Calculus will include the following topics: functions, coordinates and graphs, straight lines, transformation of coordinates, and rotation of axes. Additional topics could include conic sections, vectors, curve tracing, and locus problems. Critical thinking skills are developed through the use of application problems. (Prerequisite: Grade of 87% or better in Honors Geometry with teacher recommendation)


Calculus I (11, 12)

Calculus I will include the following topics: functions, graphs, limits, continuity, explicit and implicit differentiation, applications of differential calculus, related rates, trigonometric functions, concavity and extrema, curve sketching, antiderivatives, definite and indefinite integration. (Prerequisite: Trigonometry/Pre-Calculus) (If the student plans on taking Calculus II AP it is highly recommended that Calculus I be scheduled for the fall and Calculus II be scheduled for the spring of the same year.)


Calculus II AP (11, 12) (offered only during Spring semester)

Calculus II is an extension of Calculus I and is directed at preparing the students to take the AB Advanced Placement Calculus Test. Students will gain the understanding of the concepts of calculus and be provided with the experience of its methods and applications. The course will emphasize a multi-representational approach to calculus, with concepts, results, and problems being expressed geometrically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. Technology is used regularly by students to reinforce the relationships of functions, to implement experimentation, confirm written work, and assist in interpreting results. This course is intended to be both challenging and demanding. A graphing calculator (recommendation TI – 83 Plus, TI-84 Plus or TI-89) is necessary for this course. (Prerequisite: Calculus I) (If the student plans on taking Calculus II AP it is highly recommended that Calculus I be scheduled for the fall and Calculus II be scheduled for the spring of the same year.)

 

Honors Statistics (12)

Honors Statistics is an advanced course intended for students interested in taking a Probability and Statistics course at the college level. Topics to be covered include: Organization of Data (Graphs, Charts and Histograms); Descriptive Statistics (Measures of Central Tendency, Variance, and Position); Inferential Statistics (Counting and Probability Rules); Discrete and Continuous Distributions (Binomial, Standard Normal, T, Chi-Squared); Confidence Intervals; Hypothesis Testing; Regression and Correlations. Graphing calculators and Microsoft Excel will be used in this course. A TI – 83 Plus or TI-84 Plus is needed for this course. (Prerequisite: Grade of 87% or better in Honors Algebra II or a 93% or better in Algebra II with teacher recommendation.)

 

Finite Math (12)

Finite Math will include the following topics: Set theory and logic, probability (odds, expectation, compound probability, permutations, and combinations), statistics (measures of central tendency, dispersion and position, normal curve), numeration and number structure, linear equations, inequalities and graphs, consumer math (markups, markdowns, simple and compound interest, life insurance, installment buying, mortgages) sequences and series. A graphing calculator (A TI-83 Plus or TI-84 Plus is needed for this course.) (Prerequisite: Passing grade for Algebra II)

 

Links

11 months ago

No Pain, High Gain 
Find strategies to attack reading and math exams, to ease tension for the testing process, and to understand testing fundamentals. Teaching tips are also included.

PDE Assessment Anchors 
The Assessment Anchors are one of the many tools the Pennsylvania Department of Education has developed to better align curriculum, instruction and assessment practices throughout the state.

PDE Test Resources 
The Pa Department of Education publishes practice tests and item samplers for both teachers and students. Here is a listing of resource materials for all subjects and all grade levels.

Test Preparation Review WebPage 
Free online practice tests.

Mission

11 months ago

MISSION

The mission of the Bangor Area School District community in the area of mathematics is to provide student centered environments that encourage informed risk-taking, provide opportunities for exploration and discovery, and allow for diverse learning styles using mathematics in daily life. The learning environment will provide opportunities for students to develop the skills necessary to be mathematical problem solvers and lifelong learners who have the confidence to assume roles as self-sufficient and responsible citizens in the 21st century.

BELIEFS

  • All children must be able to draw upon past experiences, make connections to other disciplines, and apply skills to real-life situations.
  • All children must be able to develop and ask questions using higher order thinking skills.
  • All children must be able to communicate their thinking using appropriate mathematical language in both written and verbal forms, including visual, i.e. model drawing.
  • All children must be able to use the tools of mathematics (e.g., computers, calculators, measurement tools) to solve real-life problems.
  • All children must be able to recognize that any problem may have numerous approaches and solutions.

ESSENTIAL STUDENT LEARNING GOALS

  1. We expect our students to acquire and demonstrate a broad base of knowledge and skills as a foundation for continued learning.
  2. We expect our students to be: problem solvers, lifelong learners, self-sufficient and responsible citizens, complex thinkers, risk-takers, effective communicators, collaborative workers, and active listeners.

 

Objectives

11 months ago

The following objectives are whole department objectives. Every math class in the high school strive to achieve the following:


  • To provide a broad base of knowledge and skills as a foundation for continued learning.
  • To enable students to become problem solvers, lifelong learners, self-sufficient and responsible citizens, complex thinkers, risk-takers, effective communicators, collaborative workers, and active listeners.
  • To encourage students to draw upon past experiences, make connections to other disciplines, and apply skills to real-life situations.
  • To develop in students the ability to ask questions using higher order thinking skills and recognize that any problem may have numerous approaches and solutions.
  • To enable students to communicate their thinking using appropriate mathematical language in both written and verbal forms, including visual, i.e. model drawing.
  • To provide the tools of mathematics (e.g., computers, calculators, measurement tools) for students to solve real-life problems.
  • To develop in students the ability to apply deductive and inductive reasoning to the development of proofs and problem solving